Tag Archives: training

When To Take A Break From Running

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When To Take A Break From Running

As you become a happier and more relaxed runner, you will feel and see the rewards in getting fit.

  • You’ll feel strong
  • look more toned
  • have more energy in your day.
  • If you do races, you might even find yourself getting faster.
  • If you’ve been trying to take off some weight, you’ll find you’ve finally met your healthy weight.

But sometimes you aren’t seeing the results you should be seeing from running…

If you aren’t seeing the results you want, it could be you aren’t consistent enough with your running, eating healthy or following the correct race training for your abilities.

Or it could be you are running too much!

It could be you are running too much or overtraining for your race and not giving yourself a good enough rest.When to take a break from running

This is a common situation that gets ignored from a lot of runners who get caught up in getting out there every day and not listening to their body.

It’s important to pay attention to the way you feel and have running rest days per week. 

“Is it ok to take a day off from running?” 

Absolutely, your body builds muscle and strength on your rest days. A stronger body avoids injury. You don’t want to run into injury problems later and have to interrupt your training by taking a month off from running.

How long does it take to lose running fitness?

You can take up to 3 weeks off. They way I feel it out is the closer I get to those 3 weeks off the harder the training is going to be when I return.

I sometimes get exhausted training for my ultra marathons. Taking a week off during marathon training is my best solution and I feel refreshed and ready to tackle anything after returning to running after the break!

Have you had a problem with exhaustion and running? Leave a comment, I’d love to know what you’ve done to solve this problem.

Be Your Own Running Pace Predictor

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Change your motivation running today, this activity is fun!

 Be Your Own Running Pace Predictor

Know your pace and become more knowledgeable about yourself and how you feel about your running speed.

Knowing your running pace zones is the first step to getting better at challenging yourself during your run.

 

Practicing your running pace zones will put you at a huge advantage when it comes to pacing yourself during your regular runs, during interval training, and absolutely during your races. You’ll gain knowledge of what you are capable of running during different speed intervals helping you to know when you should speed up just slightly to finish well.

Play a little game with yourself and learn to be your own running pace predictor!

Practice and Learn Your Own Running Pace

  1. First: Predict how long you will run your usual route running it faster than you usually do.
  2. Then: Go out and run it!
  3.  Don’t look at your time at all throughout your run. Leave your phone at home or turn over your watch.
  4. Record when you started your run.
  5. Start your run with your usual warm up (about a 1 to 2 level speed) for about 15 minutes. Get used to how this feels.
  6.  Throw in 3-moderate-speed runs with a rest in between each run.
  7. Step your running speed up for as long as you can handle it. (about 3 to 4 level speed) Get used to how this feels.
  8. When you finish, check your time and see how close you came to your predicted time.

This is really good for learning to pace yourself running and helps you to understand

how fast you think you’re going.


Be Your Own Running Race Predictor – Things to keep an eye on… 

  • While running, rate your effort level between 1 and 5. 1 is easy and 5 very hard. If your running pace is a 3 or 4 during your run, you are at a great pace to see what feels good! Knowing your numbers are huge when you combine this with how your heart is racing, how your lungs feel and how much more effort your legs can give out for a given time.
  • How does your heart beat feel at each level speed? If your heart rate is racing, you are probably going fast! (level 4 or 5) If you want to carry your speed for any sort of distance, you have to know this internal feeling and tag it with a running pace heart rate of your own. This helps to measure your pace so you know when to bring your running pace to a moderate level pace. (level 3 to 4) Your heart and the way you feel is a great indicator for understanding you, your speed and your pace.
  • Watch out for the negative voice that tells you to stop. Instead, inject the voice of “I can do this!” and keep going! You will notice, when you start to listen to the negative voice, your effort will decrease, but you’ll feel as though the rest of your body is still working at a 3 or 4 effort level.
  • Concentrate on your 3 or 4 effort level and try to keep it right there. This is your running pace guide. Really acknowledge how you are feeling, doing this practice often enough will build the perfect effort level memory bank for you in the future.
  • When the end is coming near, this is the time to get into the 4 and 5 level zone. Kick up those heels, lean into the run and go!

If you run mostly at a 3 level, this really is the time to have fun and try to pick up the pace to a 3 and 4 effort level to start changing your running and getting faster.

Please leave a comment and let me know what you do to be your own running pace predictor when you run.
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Your 12 Week 10K Training Program

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 Clear Running Goals and Plan 

Your 12 Week 10K Training Program  

Your 12 Week 10K training PlanWeek 1 
  • Run 5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
  • Wednesday 4Km run
  • Thursday Rest and Walk for 45min.
  • Saturday rest
  • Sunday is the long run 5.5K
Week 2


      • Run 5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4Km run
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 45min.
      • Friday an easy 2/3K or walk for 45min.
      • Saturday rest
      • Sunday is the long run 6Km
Week 3
      • Run 5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4Km run 
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 45min.
      • Friday an easy 2/3K or walk for 45min.
      • Saturday rest 
      • Sunday is the long run 6.5Km
Week 4 
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4Km run
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest
      • Sunday is the long run 6.5Km
Week 5
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4Km run 
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest 
      • Sunday is the long run 7Km
Week 6 
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4Km run
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest
      • Sunday is the long run 7.5Km
Week 7 
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4/4.5Km run 
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest 
      • Sunday is the long run 8Km
Week 8 
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4/4.5Km run
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest
      • Sunday is the long run 8Km
Week 9 
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4/4.5Km run 
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest 
      • Sunday is the long run 8.5Km
Week 10 
  • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
  • Wednesday 4/4.5Km run
  • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
  • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
  • Saturday rest
  • Sunday is the long run 9Km
Week 11
      • Run 5.5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
      • Wednesday 4/4.5Km run 
      • Thursday Rest and Walk for 1hour
      • Friday an easy 3K or walk for 1hour
      • Saturday rest 
      • Sunday is the long run 9.5Km
Week 12
  • Run 5K starting your day on a Monday or Tuesday/ Switch and Rest or cross-train on Monday if your Sunday was a long run.
  • Wednesday 4/Km run
  • Thursday Rest / Walk for 1hour
  • Friday a walk for 1hour
  • Saturday rest
Important Things to note:  
      • You can change your days around to
        suit your schedule. For example if you want to start your training program week on a
        Sunday and end it on a Saturday it is perfectly fine. 
      • On your rest days, pay attention to
        the way your body is feeling. If you are not able to cross-train,
        strength train or walk do not and/or make it up another rest day. Shin Splints are a runners most common injury give your
        body time to heal. Do not forget to stretch before and after!
      • On the walk days make sure your walk is leisurely. 
      • The long runs on Sunday should be
        slow…Map your run before you go out and train running without a watch. -Not
        knowing your pace will make the run more enjoyable knowing that you can
        go slow…
      • The two other running training days of the
        week, mix them up – run hills, a tempo runs, speed drills. Alternate
        weeks, example do not do hills two weeks in a row.
      • The week of the race, train gently and relax. 
      • Go to where the race is and get familiar with it by walking and/ running it. 
      • Figure out what you are going to wear for the 10k . 
      • Go over the 10K race in your head before hand. 
      • Ask yourself pertinent questions
        about the 10K race.  Example: When are going to speed up? How do I want to
        start? Are you going to walk some of the race or run/walk? If you
        trained with a friend are you going to run the whole race with your
        friend?
      •  Have a blast running your 10K and rest the next week with no running!

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